Illinois House of Representatives

Kate Monteleone - Candidate for Illinois 50th House - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

My professional experience has been in large nonprofit organizations where I confronted the politics of poverty, which in my view, is linked to racism. The social supports that all people need to thrive are access to healthcare, education, affordable housing in safe communities and a healthy environment. These issues are the focus of my campaign for State Representative in the 50th House District. 

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

Right now I see the impact of COVID-19 devastating communities of color in my district. In fact, there is a case of wrongful death in Aurora where a woman/mother died of COVID that she contracted from her husband who worked in a meat packing plant without proper distancing, personal protection gear, and sanitization. And, I see police departments in communities of color becoming more militarized; not more effective. These issues are just the tip of the iceberg.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

I have not yet developed a position on housing.

 

Environmental Justice 

I support the Clean Energy Jobs Act—the very legislation that was blocked by ComEd. Illinois must eliminate dependency on fossil fuels, particularly coal which contaminates the air we breathe with over 80 toxic chemicals. Communities of color are the most severely impacted due to physical proximity to power plants. The health cost of the high levels of pollution is huge—asthma, COPD and other lung diseases, heart disease, and cancer. The goal of CEJA is to become carbon neutral first and then shift to clean, renewable power generation. Clean energy jobs will help facilitate our economic recovery and ensuring a diverse pool of skilled workers to perform those jobs is essential.

 

Criminal Justice

I recognize the need to end the school to prison path that too many Black and Brown youth are caught in. I have not yet developed a position on the best way forward.

 

Healthcare Equity

Having worked in health care organizations for many years, I know that a Black woman diagnosed with breast cancer is twice as likely to die, than her White counterpart. And Black women are far more likely to die in childbirth than white women. These are horrifying realities and a direct result of being denied access to health care. I am promoting an affordable public option insurance program that allows people to buy-in to the public insurance to address this situation.

 

Educational Inequities

Educational inequities result when school funding falls to local communities. The Illinois Constitution mandates that the state be the primary source of support to public education, yet the state has failed its responsibility for years. Poorly resourced communities are simply unable to generate the necessary resources to ensure quality education and the state must step up to level the playing field. I support passage of the Fair Tax amendment as a step toward increased revenue and more equitable funding for public education. I also reject diverting scarce public resources to private and religious schools who select their students.

 

Voter Suppression

The 50th House District has been designed through gerrymandering to be a safe Republican seat. The result is an incumbent who could run unopposed. Nothing signals that a vote doesn’t matter more clearly. Having no challenger and no choice is a way to suppress turnout and the vote. I entered this race specifically to give voters a choice in their representation.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

I do not have a staff. My committee leadership consists of myself, my husband and my son. Among my engaged volunteers, there are three Black people who are distributing lit and writing postcards for my campaign. In terms of gender, my volunteers are roughly 70 - 75% women.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

As a society we must tackle racial injustice by solving poverty. I have addressed the pathway I would follow to achieve equitable health care, education, and environment above. I recognize the need for a plan to focus on housing and criminal justice, but have not yet developed plans in those areas.

  

Martha Paschke - Candidate for Illinois House District 65th - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

I serve on the Social Justice committee at my church where we participated in the Chicago Regional Organizing Against Racism training in an effort to work to grow in our anti-racism efforts as an institution and as members of a majority white community. I have also engaged with local government when racist sentiments crept into the conversation about bringing affordable housing to Geneva. And I co-lead an organization whose members have and continue to engage in anti-racist initiatives like our recent Black Lives Matter sign sales that raised almost $5000 to support the Our Neighborhoods Empowered organization in Elgin. 

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

It is hard to ignore the whiteness in this district that has been created through decades of ongoing systemic racism and the policies that support it. There is a severe lack of housing diversity made especially noticeable by this district’s gerrymandering to be a ‘red’ district. It is 78.5% White, with the majority of any racial diversity concentrated in the pockets of Elgin and Pingree Grove that have made themselves more welcoming to those populations. In addition to the overall population makeup, we know that the prison population of our county further reflects the decades of over-policing and lack of adequate access to resources aimed at addressing recidivism of Black and Brown populations.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

We need to establish a system to hold municipalities accountable for meeting the minimum of 10% affordable housing already mandated by the state. 

 

Environmental Justice 

We need to work hard to ensure that resources are available to put an end to any and all pollution of the land, air, and water - pollution that is known to unequally impact neighborhoods that are primarily home to POC. We also need to ensure that POC are prioritized for job training for new ‘green’ jobs.

 

Criminal Justice

I’d like to get rid of cash bonds which overwhelmingly and negatively impact Black women. Defelonize drug possession - make it a misdemeanor instead. Focus funding on violence prevention services that are proven to break the cycle that leads to mass incarceration of Black men. Look at ways to institute citizen review boards to oversee police misconduct cases.

 

Healthcare Equity

We need to address the way that Medicaid is credentialed and paid in order to bring more providers on board. I’ve seen firsthand how difficult it can be for folks on Medicaid to locate treatment (especially mental health). We need to work to encourage and incentivise young Black and Brown people to enter the medical field, as we know that people feel more comfortable being treated (and therefore more likely to seek treatment) by someone who understands their unique cultural experiences. And we need to look at the practice models we are using to streamline care - for example combining mental and physical healthcare in one office to open up treatment options and allow for collaborative care. And because it is a special passion of mine, I want to work to expand access to and encourage training of more Black and Brown midwives and doulas to help work to bring down the devastating maternal mortality rates we are currently experiencing.

 

Educational Inequities

We need to ensure that our state steps up to properly fund education to both boost equity and to remove the burden from property tax payers. Our overreliance on property taxes to support local school funding has driven us to a point of gross inequality that adversely affects our populations of Black and Brown children. 

 

Voter Suppression

While we do not see voter suppression to the extent it is seen in many other states, we do need to carefully assess any obstacles that may exist especially in Black and Brown communities. This year due to the pandemic, we have seen a number of measures including an expanded push for Vote By Mail, Early Voting expansion, and the school holiday on Election Day, all of which improve access to voting. I would like to see at least some of these measures be made permanent, with an added look into voter education to improve understanding about how each of these function as I have run into a great deal of confusion amongst various populations as I make voter outreach calls.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

My campaign team can be viewed here: https://martha4il65.com/team-martha/ I am incredibly proud of the team that has formed in support of my candidacy. They come from a broad range of backgrounds, are mostly women, and demonstrate my commitment to diverse representation.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I think I covered most everything, but am eager to learn of any and all opportunities to tackle this very real and very significant brokenness in our country.

Paul Stoddard - Candidate for Illinois House District 70th - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

To be honest, although I have always been a supporter of equal rights for all, I had been too much on the sidelines until the recent protests. But having attended various marches, protests, and town halls, and having had the chance to listen to the stories being told, and talking with those telling them, I have started to see actions I can take. So far I have recommended that DeKalb County and the city of DeKalb institute implicit-bias training. Both have begun the process. I have also started discussion on the County Board about rethinking policing in the county.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

Attitudes of some law enforcement officers seem to be dependent on race. I’ve heard accounts of police who treat White citizens in friendly, helpful ways, but become cold (albeit still professional in most cases) when dealing with Black citizens. There are still segments of the community who treat Blacks with suspicion.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

We need to enact a tenants’ “Bill of Rights.” Equal opportunity housing and lending laws need to be enforced.

 

Environmental Justice 

Obviously zoning regulations need to treat all regions fairly, and need to be enforced. The IEPA needs to be empowered (financially and legally) to enforce regulations and to arrange for cleanup of environmentally blighted areas.

 

Criminal Justice

I think many of the suggestions I’ve heard from local BLM leaders and protestors should be enacted. Better screening of law enforcement new hires, more extensive training in de-escalation techniques, reallocating funds to social workers and others specifically trained to deal with domestic disputes, no tolerance for officers who abuse their badges. More citizen oversight of law enforcement agencies should help change the attitude from “war on crime” or “us vs. them” back to “protect and serve.”

 

Healthcare Equity

We must have universal access to affordable health care. Health care is a right, not a privilege. 

 

Educational Inequities

Schools are funded by local property taxes, which leads to our high tax rates and, more importantly, to unacceptable inequities in school funding (and thus quality) based on a community’s financial status. We need to fully fund the evidence-based funding algorithm.

 

Voter Suppression

With legislative changes allowing for a lengthy early-voting period and mail-in balloting, I believe voting is as easy and convenient as it's ever been. I’d be willing, though, to hear suggestions on how to make it easier and fairer.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

Campaign manager, treasurer, communications director, graphics designer are all women. Other advisors are men, one of whom is Black. We have no Latinx people at this time.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I will push for implicit-bias training for all legislators and department heads, to be followed by all state employees. I truly believe that most people do not see themselves as racist, or wish to be seen as racist, but nevertheless hold prejudiced views which affect their treatment of Blacks and People of Color. Being able to identify those views in oneself is the first step towards treating all people equally.

 

Barbara Hernandez - Candidate for Illinois House District 83 - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

I have been active in supporting activists, organizations and the community to combat anti-racism. I have joined marches and held discussions where others and I can dive into deep discussions of what is happening in our community and how we can change the problem.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

There are several racial inequities I see in the 83rd District there is a lack of representation in many elected offices, lack of minority owned business and resources for them to be successful. Lack of transparency when there are events or issues that pertain to the minority community, people usually just try to look the other way.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

Currently I have been working alongside a few of my colleagues to make housing affordable and more accessible for low income families who have had to deal with racial discrimination.

 

Environmental Justice 

CEJA is one of the main bills that I supported since day one to allow more investment to our environment but also provide jobs and training for our families.

 

Criminal Justice

I have supported and continue to support bills that will protect the minority community from injustices and provide them with resources that will allow them to have a better lifestyle.

 

Healthcare Equity

I continue to support bills that protect women and their children from unfair medical neglect that might cause women of color to lose their babies. Increasing medical resources and affordability is a priority as I voted for the bill that would allow to decrease the price of insulin.

 

Educational Inequities

No response

 

Voter Suppression

This past session I was able to vote to expand mail in ballots and offer other ways of voting safely due to COVID. This will open the doors to be able to increase accessibility to voting from home, curbside pick-up and other modern ways. We must continue to protect people's opportunity to vote and ensure that the elections are secure and open to everyone who chooses to participate.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

Currently, my state team includes all women and two men, this includes interns as well. My staff are from different backgrounds and ethnicities.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

For over a year now my office and I have had social justice committees with the public where we talk about a new topic every month, we have talked about police brutality, resources for minority owned businesses, mental health in the minority community, and other important topics. I want to continue with the conversations and provide awareness to the community of resources that are designed to help the minority community but are at times not used.

  

KANE COUNTY LOCAL CANDIDATES

Jamie Mosser - Candidate County State's Attorney - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

As  a prosecutor, I was trained to make offers to resolve cases based on an individual's alleged crime and his/her criminal history. I was also trained to review the history of the defendant to see what offer was appropriate in the case. I did not look at a person's race or gender. As a supervisor at the office, I trained younger attorneys to review cases in the same way. As a legal aid attorney for Prairie State Legal Services, I represented victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault of all races. I advocated for each client in the best possible way understanding the history each client came with. I was a proponent of our implicit bias training. As a private attorney and citizen, I serve on three boards: Mutual Ground, Rise From the Ashes, and the Pie Project. Mutual Ground, a DV/SA service agency and shelter, aids those in need. We have an anti-racism policy and are embarking on anti-racism training for both staff and the board. Rise From the Ashes is a local not for profit that matches victims of DV with attorneys, counselors, and victim advocates. Through our interview process, we do not take into consideration the race of the individual. We focus on those impoverished who otherwise would not have access to justice. The Pie Project uses Yoga as a means of highlighting social issues in our community. Last summer, I helped to organize fundraisers to bring yoga services to those in our Kane County Jail, the Community Crisis Center and for defendants in our Drug Rehabilitative Court, Mental Health Court, and Veteran's Court. My work has been dedicated to serving those who historically have had less advantages than others because of race and financial status. Statistically, most of the clients have been people of color. By advocating for people of color in the community and in court, I have provided an opportunity for greater access to services and help while combating the systemic racism in our system.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

In Kane County, I have lived in North Aurora and Campton Hills. There is a vast wealth difference between these two villages. I have also had the opportunity to work with people who have lived in all our cities, towns, and villages. As a prosecutor and a legal aid attorney, there was no question that most of the people that came before me were people of color. The wealth disparity in our community along with the access to resources is significant. While I was a prosecutor, I created a cyberbullying program that taught kids the criminal implications of cyberbullying. I taught in schools all over Kane County. There was a significant difference when going to schools in St. Charles and Batavia to Aurora and Elgin. It appeared that the more affluent schools had less kids in classes and better facilities. Our criminal justice system has created long standing racial inequities. This began in the 1970's when we created the 'War on Drugs' and the 'War on Poverty' and was only made worse by putting more money into law enforcement and less into social services. As a community, we then expected the police to solve all the problems through traditional policing. This traditional policing included directed investigations that targeted lower income communities that primarily were made up of people of color. We then allowed drug addictions and mental health issues to become criminalized instead of treated. These individuals then had convictions on their record and had to spend time in jail or prison which prevented them from getting a job, getting housing, or getting an education to be a 'productive' member of society. While prosecutor's offices focused on the safety of the community, with repeat offenders, the offer was jail or prison instead of getting to the root of the criminal behavior. Our jails and prison have more people of color than whites which does not match our population. 

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

Not Applicable. The State’s Attorney, by statute, is limited to prosecuting traffic and criminal offenses and to representing the County in civil matters including our elected officials. As such and unless there is a criminal act or a civil lawsuit, we will be unable to have a policy or action that deals with the housing inequality

 

Environmental Justice 

Not Applicable.  The State’s Attorney, by statute, is limited to prosecuting traffic and criminal offenses and to representing the County in civil matters including our elected officials. As such and unless there is a criminal act or a civil lawsuit, we will be unable to have a policy or action that deals with environmental justice.

 

Criminal Justice

Creation of a Citizen’s Police Review Board – this will be made up of seven people within the Kane County community. These will be lawyers, citizens and at least one person with an investigative or military background. When there is a case involving a police officer accused of a crime or a current case where an officer has been accused of misconduct, the CPRB will review all of the reports and evidence. They will then be able to either agree with or disagree with the decision of the SA. This board will not be controlled by the SAO but rather be an independent board. This will provide transparency and accountability from our law enforcement. Creation of a Community Prosecution Unit – each community will have a prosecutor assigned to attend meetings, provide presentations and training, and advise of SAO cases/issues. It is preferred that the prosecutor live in the community. This is providing a direct line from the community to the SA about issues that are ongoing. This will also provide transparency of the SAO and what we are doing. Creation of a Conviction Integrity Unit– this will be staffed by experienced prosecutors who will review post-sentence cases when there is an allegation of improper behavior by the police, the prosecutor or the defense attorney. The idea is to have a system of checks and balances to ensure that we are doing justice. The findings will then be presented to the State’s Attorney for final decision based on the recommendations. Bring a pre-arrest diversion program similar to the LEADS system in Seattle, WA – This is a program that identifies individuals at the time of arrest that have drug addiction or mental health issues and diverts them into treatment instead of jail. This means that we get people into treatment at a quicker rate than waiting for the court system to do so. It also means that people do not have the stigma of an arrest and are not spending time in court and away from work and their family. http://leadkingcounty.org/

 

Healthcare Equity

Not Applicable.  The State’s Attorney, by statute, is limited to prosecuting traffic and criminal offenses and to representing the County in civil matters including our elected officials. As such and unless there is a criminal act or a civil lawsuit, we will be unable to have a policy or action that deals with the healthcare equity.

 

Educational Inequities

Not Applicable.  The State’s Attorney, by statute, is limited to prosecuting traffic and criminal offenses and to representing the County in civil matters including our elected officials. As such and unless there is a criminal act or a civil lawsuit, we will be unable to have a policy or action that deals with the educational inequities.

 

Voter Suppression

It is the responsibility of the Kane County State’s Attorney to monitor the election process in Kane County and respond to any voting problems or irregularities at polling places in Kane County. Currently, the State’s Attorney has set up an Election Complaint Line for residents experiencing voting suppression issues (or issues with improper electioneering). As the next State’s Attorney, I will not only have the complaint hotline, but I will have a group of prosecutors and support staff who will be on duty and monitoring the polling places so that we are proactive regarding these issues and not just reactive.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

I have a staff of all volunteers with one paid social media manager. The social media manager is a Hispanic male. My campaign manager is a Caucasian female. Of the primary campaign staff, I have a Hispanic female, four Caucasian females, one Caucasian male, and three Hispanic males.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

Diversion Programs for the Youth (through 23) – Study after study has shown us that the brain is still developing up until the age of 23. Yet, we treat anyone that is 18 and on as if they can make clear decisions. When someone commits a crime and gets a conviction at an early age, that will follow them for life and could have extremely negative consequences. We need to recognize this and deal with these cases appropriately. Peer Juries need to be brought back to be used for these cases and to have defendants sit on the juries to understand their choices. Holistic diversion for all including opportunities for community service. Bring a Program to deal with individuals in gangs such as the Comprehensive Gang Model developed by the OJJDP – community mobilization, opportunities, social intervention, removal of gang tattoos, etc. Education is key. Get back into schools and talk about issues – date rape, sexting, cyberstalking. We need to really educate kids on what could happen with the decisions that they make. Creation of a Screening Division – Staffed by experienced prosecutors. These prosecutors would have guidelines to follow in charging or denying cases. Having this experience with the guidelines means consistent charging decisions. Additionally, we would change the way that we screen cases by not asking for the name or demographic information of the accused prior to authorizing or denying charges. -Creation of vertical prosecution units. This means that one prosecutor, with experience, will stay with the case or cases from start to finish. For example, having a property crimes division. These prosecutors will only handle these matters. The offers will be more consistent and will be efficiently prosecuted getting people into treatment and out of the criminal justice system at a quicker rate. Transparency - we must release statistics. We must start with demographics and then relate those demographics to the conclusion of the case. We  must address racial disparity. The only way to deal with the discrimination of people based on race, gender, or socioeconomic status is to see that it is happening, admit that it is happening and find out where the problem is. By releasing the statistics, we will see if there is an issue and deal with it immediately. Training within the office - the attorneys and staff members of the office will have yearly training on many topics including implicit bias. We will also have training regarding the impact of trauma on an individual and how that may lead to criminal behavior.

Penny Wegman - Candidate for County Auditor - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

As a realtor, I assist first time home buyers with housing purchases. I am strongly opposed to steering, redlining and blockbusting.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

The racial inequities that I see in my district are a racial wealth gap, and educational gap.

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

NA

 

Environmental Justice 

NA

 

Criminal Justice

NA

Healthcare Equity

NA

Educational Inequities

NA

 

Voter Suppression

NA

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

My campaign consists of my father, sister, 13 year-old niece and myself.

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

My office will treat every employee of the county equally, and will hold each accountable to the highest standards in regard to spending of county funds regardless of position held.

 

 

 

Theresa Berreiro - Candidate for County Circuit Clerk - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

On the county board I voted for and fought to include a drug addiction center in the middle of the county. The neighbors would have been in support of it if it was anywhere else. They fought against it and it failed. I also voted to make affordable housing available throughout Kane county. These developments failed. I worked to keep an open mind and work toward diversification in the county. These efforts resulted in being on the receiving end of negative comments from angry residents. I worked to get Riverboat Grants granted to agencies addressing many social issues, such as the Joseph Corporation of Aurora. They were not included in initial funding recommendations. I worked to convince the board of their need and benefit of their important programs resulting in funding.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

I live in a very diverse county board district. Social inequities can be found in zip code 60505 where I live and in our school district 131. They are at the opposite end of the spectrum of neighboring communities. The portion of Aurora where I live has the most need. The socio-economic profile consists of the lowest education levels, lowest income levels, highest percentage of poverty, and the highest dropout rates in Kane county. On top of all this, 60505 has the highest number of covid-19 positive cases in Kane County and the highest concentration of chronic diseases in the county. Thanks to the Kane County Health Department, anyone can visit the kanehealthcounts.com website and compare zip code 60505 and school district 131 to any of the others in the county to see huge inequities firsthand.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

NA

 

Environmental Justice 

NA

 

Criminal Justice

NA

 

Healthcare Equity

NA

 

Educational Inequities

NA

 

Voter Suppression

NA

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

My campaign staff doesn’t have any paid staff. My campaign committee consists of volunteers: Out of 9 people 7 are women and 2 are men. My campaign committee is also diverse with 4 Hispanic, 4 white, 1 black committee members.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities

and promote racial justice?

In the circuit clerk’s office, I will work towards making the office reflective of the community. Office staff should also be involved in career days and career fairs to help expose young people towards potential career paths. Oftentimes, young people in urban areas are not aware of many careers. We need to be proactive and build partnerships and increase outreach to help diversify our applicant pool. I will need to review our ability to serve those that are non-English speaking, training programs for staff and the promotion processes to help diversify the office’s workforce at all levels.

 

KANE COUNTY BOARD CANDIDATES

Corrine Pierog - Candidate for County Board Chair - Democrat

  

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

Like many white people in Kane County, I have always considered myself to be a good ally to those fighting for racial justice. However, the murders and violent acts that have shaken our nations has further opened my eyes to the fact that simply not being a racist does nothing to solve the problem. We must first examine our own prejudices and then act, including in our own everyday lives, to promote anti-racism. In the wake of the murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, I participated in marches and other demonstrations all over Kane County. I will continue to stand with and learn from community leaders and Black Lives Matter groups and do my part to call out racism when I see it.

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

Kane County is a wonderful and diverse place to live, and but it is not immune to discrimination and inequality. Like in the surrounding areas, too many young black men languish in the county jail for non-violent offenses, and there is a wide disparity when it comes to opportunities in business. Additionally, the diversity of the county’s leadership does not accurately reflect our diversity, which continues to be a stain on our government. The Chair must understand that criminal justice reform is a human rights issue. We need to continue working with community partners like Amita Medical Center in Aurora to establish crisis stabilization units throughout Kane County, along with the future expansion of supportive long- term transitional housing, and job training.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

I have served on the St. Charles Housing Commission and have seen first-hand how this issue affects people throughout the county. Housing inequality isn’t just about the difference between being homeless and having a roof over your head, it’s about first-responders, teachers, and other working class residents being able to live close to where they work; it’s also about a broad access to all of Kane County’s geography across racial and economic lines. As Chair, I will support initiatives to integrate the County racially and economically by expanding affordable housing opportunities.

 

Environmental Justice 

Our County’s natural surroundings and forest preserves provide a place for residents from all walks of life to come together. These rich assets also function as an economic driver through tourism, agriculture, and business development. The Fox River and the County’s aquifers provide for industrial growth, recreational activities, and our drinking water. But Kane County’s water is a finite resource and must be assessed and protected for future generations and growth. Best practices of sustainability, renewable energy, water conservation, public and alternative transportation must be topics that are addressed, investigated, and if appropriate initiated on the County level. Additionally, Kane County must honor and celebrate its diversity by ensuring that there is equity throughout Kane County’s government, affordable housing, and access to public transportation, all of which have a direct effect on our environment.

 

Criminal Justice

I understand that criminal justice reform is a human rights issue. We need bail reform for non-violent crimes and first-time offenders, an expansion of the successful electronic monitoring program, and continue working with community partners throughout Kane County, along with the future expansion of supportive long-term transitional housing, and job training for ex-offenders. Sheriff Hain has made great effort in reducing recidivism in Kane County. But there is much more work to be done. Supportive housing, job training, and crisis intervention programs must be encouraged. Working with Kane County’s Office of Economic Development, non-profit organizations, and job-training partners, the County can begin to address the necessary support systems.

 

Healthcare Equity

During this time of crisis, I will make sure that funding for the public health department is a top priority for the Chair and the County Board. We have lived through 8 years of consistent cuts to services, and people of color disproportionately suffer under these conditions. Responsible fiscal stewardship means leveraging the county’s vast resources to take care of our citizens in times of need.

 

Educational Inequities

While Kane County has no official capacity to directly support education for Kane County’s residents, it does support the Juvenile Drug Court and the Juvenile Justice Center. Working in tandem with the Kane County Office of Regional Education, Kane County can insure that both of these programs have the resources needed to support these program’s efforts in assuring that juvenile offenders are able to continue their education and make a successful transition back into their public school program. As a former member of the St. Charles D303 Board of Education, the school district that manages the instruction for the Juvenile Justice Center Education Program, I am fully aware of the value and importance of this effort in promoting education as a powerful tool to reduce recidivism and future economic opportunity.

 

Voter Suppression

In neighboring DuPage County, there are plans for 300 vote by mail drop boxes, here in Kane County we could see as few as three. I believe that voting should be as accessible and easy as possible. We need to educate Kane County’s citizens of the various opportunities to vote, including the promotion of early voting and vote by mail. I sincerely believe that when more people vote, more progress is mad. As long as we are living in a global health crisis, it is going to take more of an effort by the county to enfranchise voters. As Chair, I will welcome that challenge.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

No response

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

As County Board Chair, I will immediately review the working conditions for Kane County’s employees of color. This includes hiring practices, office culture, and opportunities for advancement. Additionally, I support working with the Chief Judge and States Attorney to implement expungement fairs in Kane County. These events are important opportunities to raise awareness about resources available to those who are eligible for record expungement and provide guidance to help individuals remove barriers and improve their quality of life through available public assistance.

Mavis Bates - Candidate for County Board District 4 - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

When I was at the University of Illinois in 1968, I helped to create a group called Students Against Racism, SAR.  We held a lot of meetings trying to stop racism on our campus, along with fighting against the Vietnam War. My main passion in life is environmentalism and sustainability. I used to think that I would worry about climate change and let other people worry about racism, although I always supported anti-racism. Now I know that racism and protecting the environment are interwoven. If we think we can have “throw away people”, then we have to expect that people think we can have a “throw away planet”. I am active in the Sierra Club and we are working hard to fight racism through supporting the Black Lives Matter movement. I have personally been to a few anti-racism demonstrations in the last 100 days.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

I’m sorry to say that I see plenty of racial inequities in my district. It's easy to see that many people of color are living in poverty. Their schools are often underfunded. They are not being given opportunities to get the same jobs as white people. They also speak about being harassed by the police.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

I would make sure that people of color are given the same opportunities to rent or buy a home in all areas that whites can. I would also encourage my constituents to report to me any instances of landlords charging higher rents to people of color, or not keeping up their property.

 

Environmental Justice 

This means making sure that minority neighborhoods are not stuck with air pollution, water pollution, or any other kind of environmental problems more than other neighborhoods. Everybody should benefit from the environment equally and everybody should share the burden of environmental problems equally. Although we should all work to eliminate those problems for everybody.

 

Criminal Justice

This is huge.  Everybody should receive equal treatment under the law.  We need to “rethink the police”.  We should not expect our police to act as social workers, substance abuse counselors, or marriage counselors.  We have to root out systemic racism everywhere, especially in our criminal justice system.

 

Healthcare Equity

We cannot let our people of color suffer unequally from health problems. That goes for good nutrition to insurance. We need to expand Obama Care so that every American has good health insurance so everybody can go to the doctor when they need to. We need better prenatal care for Black and Latina women.  

 

Educational Inequities

We need to make sure that all children, especially those of color, have equal educational opportunities, especially during the coronavirus crisis. Every child needs access to face to face learning or e-learning. Some kids will need laptops or Ipads, and they will need hotspots in their homes or wherever they are living in order to access the internet.

 

Voter Suppression

Voter suppression must be stopped everywhere. In Illinois we need to make sure that everybody knows that a returning citizen (returning from prison) has the right to vote. Even ex-felons have the right to vote in Illinois, as long as they are not in jail. I will fight voter suppression wherever I can find it.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

I don’t have any paid staff, but my volunteers include Black People, Latinas, and White People. Mostly women, but with one Black young man who did my video, and one White man who has gone knocking on doors with me.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I want to make sure that the Sheriff’s department is operating in a just manner, including conditions at the jail and the juvenile home. We need to make sure that our courts are run on a just basis. Because we need to help people recover from the COVID-19 crisis, we need to make sure that those in most need are served, especially people of color. I want to make sure that air pollution and water pollution are not tolerated anywhere but especially not in areas that are mostly occupied by people of color.

 

Ruth Kuzmanic – Candidate for County Board District 12 - Democrat

 

1.What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

I worked as a high school teacher for 35 years.  Many times, especially in the last 5 years, I received diversity/equity training.  I have always and will continue to support diversity.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

Even though I grew up in Chicago in a diverse community, I have experienced white privilege throughout my lifetime.  After reading the book, I am much more tuned into those privileges. I do see micro-aggressions on local social media (NextDoor), and it disturbs me.  Awareness is the first step to change.

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues?

Housing inequalities

When I am elected to the Kane County Board, I will have a lot to learn to get up to speed on these issues.  I will listen to the recommendations from those people that work most directly in each of the specific areas. Certainly, there is much room for growth throughout our county.  

 

Environmental justice

When I am elected to the Kane County Board, I will have a lot to learn to get up to speed on these issues.  I will listen to the recommendations from those people that work most directly in each of the specific areas. Certainly, there is much room for growth throughout our county.  

 

Criminal justice 

I fully support the recommendations of the Kane county Sheriff Ron Hain.  I am in support that the electronic monitoring program could be expanded.

 

Healthcare equity 

The Kane County Health Department Executive Director, Barbara Jeffers is doing her level best to get equitable services to the residents of Kane County.  This COVID19 pandemic has shown me how significant the health department services are to the health of our community. I would listen to the recommendations of Ms. Jeffers as to what the needs are and use the Cares Act to fund those recommendations.

 

Educational inequities

When I am elected to the Kane County Board, I will have a lot to learn to get up to speed on these issues.  I will listen to the recommendations from those people that work most directly in each of the specific areas. Certainly, there is much room for growth throughout our county.  

 

Voter suppression

Again, with COVID19 voting options are much more significant to Kane County voters this election cycle.  There does seem to be a need for improvement in the Kane County Clerk office in terms of improving the communication with the community regarding those options.  We are just 60 days away from the election.  I am hoping that communication will be forth coming.  

 

4.What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff? 

I don’t have a “staff”, it’s just me and my loved ones.   Your group has been very helpful in distributing information to doors.  I greatly appreciate all the help!

 

5.As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I would continue to promote the worth of all peoples. It’s certainly a learning curve, but if not now-when?

William Bachman - Candidate for County Board District 14 - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

Because I have not been in any major leadership position previously, I have not been in a position to achieve results except at the personal level. My background in southeastern VA made me aware of the depth of racial inequalities in this country at an early age and the spectrum of benefits that I have accrued as a white male in this society. This awareness has allowed me to check my behaviors and hopefully be an ally as I have traveled my path. I have confronted racist behavior when I have seen it and tried to explain why and how it is harmful. This has naturally cost me relationships, some long term.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

The better question would be what racial inequalities do I not see. If you look at any major area, healthcare, employment, education, wealth, criminal justice, etc., you can see the effects of racial inequalities. I can go more in depth if you like, but it is somewhat obvious.

 

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

I will ensure that all applicable race based regulations are followed.

 

Environmental Justice 

This is actually a major factor in my current employment. Too often, those that are lacking in “power” are unfairly targeted for environmental harms. People must be treated equally. Race, economic differences, etc. will play no role, except when necessary to alleviate past harms.

 

Criminal Justice

Probably NA, but I will assist those that have been harmed unfairly. We need to ensure that our law enforcement officers and court system treats all individuals fairly and equally.

 

Healthcare Equity

This is a pretty complex area because it combines levels of healthcare and socioeconomic factors. I will attempt to ensure that the Kane County Health Department has the necessary resources to assist in this area. From an economic standpoint, I will encourage the adoption of a living wage throughout our county as the minimum wage. This may be difficult, but I will initially target county employees to ensure the lowest level employees are compensated at that level. Contractors doing business with the county and any entity that receives a grant or tax incentive should provide that all their staff are compensated at that level or higher. Potentially we could consider a means to encourage businesses in the county to offer a living wage.

 

Educational Inequities

This is more a school district/municipality issue.

 

Voter Suppression

Voter suppression is abhorrent and must be stopped in all forms. I will strongly oppose any effort to suppress one’s voting rights including through partisan gerrymandering.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

I am the only staff member. White, male.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I plan to hold monthly meetings, both online and face-to-face versions, if I am elected. At one of each type, I plan to have an outside speaker well versed in this subject to address attendees for educational purposes. If elected, I hope to mentor diverse candidates towards gaining greater inclusion in government. In all my decision-making, I will consider whether racial inequalities and racial justice are in play.

 

 

Sandy Kaczmarski - Candidate for County Board District 18 - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

I have joined a number of protests and call it out whenever I can. Staying silent is not an option.

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

Not enough diversity. Same issues we’ve been fighting for a long time: housing (recent opposition to low income housing project in west Geneva), economic disparities. 

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

As a county board member, I will do what I can to support more affordable housing for everyone, and to dispel any unfounded “fears” that affordable housing equals “undesirables.”

 

Environmental Justice 

Protecting the environment is one of my key issues. I want to expand our use of solar and other “green” measures in county buildings, and to protect our natural resources for future generations. Encourage planting natives and pollinators in landscaping at home and offices, and encourage people to get outside more and enjoy the resources we have here in Kane County…numerous studies show connecting with nature improves overall health. 

 

Criminal Justice

Much needs to be done in this area, particularly with our county’s youth. Too often they make one or two mistakes, and instead of positive support they are pushed into continuing on a criminal track. This has to stop. 

 

Healthcare Equity

Unfortunately, this issue has to be dealt with at the state and federal level. We have the worst healthcare system in the world. I can only hope it changes soon as more and more are faced with no health care and ridiculous costs. 

 

Educational Inequities

Many people in this area seem to believe that everyone has access to the internet, everyone gets good grades, and all the kids are stellar in extra-curricular activities. The truth is, many families struggle, many don’t have multiple computers and devices at home, and focus on more important family issues. Everyone deserves an education, and we need to do more to support everyone and allow all our students to achieve their individual successes. Before and after school programs, teacher resources, and anything else that will help students succeed should be fully supported. 

 

Voter Suppression

Kane County, fortunately, has done a pretty good job in helping everyone vote and get registered. They have done a good job in promoting mail-in voting by providing early ballots and drop-off information. 

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

No response

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I will do whatever I can to call out racial inequities. I am happy to say we have a fairly adequate amount of diversity on our county board, and there are several very qualified black and Latina candidates running for office state- and county-wide that I support. 

Verner (Vern) Tepe - Candidate for County Board District 22 - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

I am fortunate to live in Elgin which is a diverse and multicultural city. I serve on several boards and am a current Elgin trustee. Recently I was a part of the Elgin Police Department and The Coalition of Religious Leaders educational series which focused on constructive ways of combating racism in the Elgin community.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

As in many other areas, we are keenly aware of the need to do more to provide opportunities for a diverse population. Elgin has a very diverse population including numerous minorities (African American; Hispanic; Muslim; Vietnamese). My wife (Judith) is on the Elgin Human Relations Commission. We selected Elgin as a place to live based partially on its diverse population demographics. Elgin is currently in the process of building a new housing center with the aim of providing families with an affordable housing option. The Elgin City Council is on an ever increasing quest to address the homeless population.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

No response

 

Environmental Justice 

No response

 

Criminal Justice

No response

 

Healthcare Equity

No response

 

Educational Inequities

No response

 

Voter Suppression

No response

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

No response

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I will be on the Kane County Board. As such I will be one of 24 members that handle the budget and establish policy. So my ‘office’ will not be leading the charge. BUT – my tenets in these areas are as follows: No one should be denied housing opportunities based on their race, religion, or ethnicity! We need to take major steps to restore our environment (I drive an electric car & have solar panels on my house). The inequities in our justice system have been ignored far too long. I agree with the steps that Sheriff Hain has taken, but we have to do more. Healthcare is a right – not a privilege! Affordable insurance (without pre-conditions) needs to be available to all. And Medicaid needs to be expanded. Much more needs to be done in addressing mental health. That is why I worked on the committee that successfully passed the Mental Health Referendum in Elgin Township this year. We need to address education starting with pre-school. My wife has worked with 1st graders, as a volunteer, for several years. Too many children start 1st grade without knowing their letters or numbers. Voting is a right. Let’s make it easier to vote – not harder. I applaud the mail-in voting process that is occurring in Kane County this year. 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I plan to hold monthly meetings, both online and face-to-face versions, if I am elected. At one of each type, I plan to have an outside speaker well versed in this subject to address attendees for educational purposes. If elected, I hope to mentor diverse candidates towards gaining greater inclusion in government. In all my decision-making, I will consider whether racial inequalities and racial justice are in play.

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

Judges - 16th Circuit Court

Elizabeth Flood - Candidate for Judge 16th Circuit Court - Republican

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

As a judge, I am entirely prohibited from supporting political causes, but I am trained to recognize my own implicit bias, and I am required to treat everyone fairly under the law. In a poll by the Illinois State and Kane County Bar Associations, I received a score of 99.14 for being sensitive to diversity in my courtroom [Illinois State Bar Association Advisory Poll 2020 16th Judicial Circuit].

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

The job of the Court system is to fairly uphold laws which are created by the Executive and Legislative branches of government. Judges do not create policies but can always try to make sure these procedures in court are fair.

 

Environmental Justice 

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

Criminal Justice

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

Healthcare Equity

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

Educational Inequities

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

Voter Suppression

There are socio-economic inequalities among races and ethnic groups in Kane County. These can lead to unequal results in the Justice system. There can be some implicit biases by police officers making arrests. The Justice system has responded with bond reforms and alternative courtrooms to address the root cause of criminal behavior and allow people to keep their jobs after arrest.

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

Myself and my husband, who are White. An IT consultant who is Asian.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

I will always treat people in my courtroom fairly and with respect. In the same Bar poll rating, I received a rating for Impartiality of 96.62%. I will seek to advance the diversity of the judiciary by appointing qualified Associates Judges of all genders, ethnicities, and nationalities. 

Brittany Michelle Pedersen - Candidate for Judge 16th Circuit Court - Democrat

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

As a bi-racial African-American and Danish American my experience fighting against racism and supporting anti-racism began as long as I can remember. As a child one of my first memories of our fight against inequality was the NAACP boycott of Denny’s Restaurant for their overt discrimination in hiring and serving Black people. We never ate at Denny’s and whenever friends wanted to go there, I remember telling them we couldn’t and why as a teenager. That may seem arbitrary, but it was instilled in me at a very young age to speak out about racial inequality and stand up for equal rights and access to employment and education for minorities and all people. As a student at Duke University, I was a member of the Black Student Alliance that organized a 2 day sit-in to have Martin Luther King Day, recognized as a school holiday. This protest was not only about not having classes but also giving a day off work to the University of employees that were 70% African American to honor and recognize the civil and equal rights that our parents and grandparents and some of the University’s employees fought for. As a Public Defender I was part of a multi-disciplinary committee that looked at addressing the huge racial disparities of children in the Kane County foster care system that were removed from their family by DCFS. I continue to support anti-racism as a governing board member of Two Rivers Head Start, addressing access to education for all regardless of economic ability. I operate two Black and women owned businesses in our County employing other minorities and women. I participate and am a member in the African American Chamber of Commerce and support other organizations as they fight to end racism and inequality.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

My district is Kane County and I will limit my answer to the Courts for this particular answer as it is most relevant for my position. First our Judiciary does not reflect our community at large and absolutely does not reflect the make-up of the individuals that are actively involved in legal cases presently before it. It has been over a quarter of a century since the first Black Judge in the county was appointed and almost 25 years since he was elected a Circuit Court Judge. He retired in 2014 and it was not until this year in late January that only the second black man was appointed, I might add after 12 years of applying and myself as a black candidate entered the race openly addressing this unfortunate reality of our Judiciary. We currently only have 2 women Circuit Court Judges and after this election we unfortunately will only still have 2. We now have 4 Hispanic Judges but two of those appointments just came in the last 2 or so years. We also have 1 Indo-American Judge. However, the circuit court bench, our elected bench, is overwhelmingly white and male. We do not have any overt racist policies or procedures and I will say that all Judges and courtroom personnel strive to look at each case and each individual equally. But it is clear that in our criminal courts that defendants are disproportionately black and brown and that our child support enforcement courts are disproportionately black and brown. Now, this is a result of systemic racist policies and policies that on paper do not intend to be applied unequally but in practice show the racial inequalities, examples are DCFS removal proceedings and child support enforcement for individuals who receive monetary government assistance. Finally access to the Courts and the laws that protect us is still daunting and intimidating for many especially minorities and the poor. Even when there are programs and initiatives in place, knowledge of these resources is not easy to find or openly available. It has been widely studied and researched that seeing other people that share your same race and/or gender and/or ethnicity can make an experience or place feel safer and more inviting.  Our courtrooms need personnel at all levels including the Judges, attorneys, clerks, bailiffs, and sheriffs, that share the same race, gender, ethnicities as the community at large.  The Courts are here to serve and protect the public and to ensure that all people have equal access to and protections under the laws of the United States and the State of Illinois.   

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues:

 

Housing Inequalities

Judges are in the unique position where we cannot comment about issues that may be present in front of them. It is very possible that cases concerning the topics below may be litigated in my future courtrooms and therefore I cannot give specific answers. However, I will say that I will apply the law as written and the legal precedents that have been set by the appellate and supreme courts in every case before me. I will continue to stay educated on changes in the law and will also consult case law and statutes where I need to find the applicable law to each and every case and legal scenario. I will look at the facts of each case with impartiality and an open mind. I will treat each individual that steps into my courtroom with respect and look at their cases with understanding of their individual life paths and experiences. These are the litigant’s cases and not “my cases” as some Judges will say. I will treat each case with the attention, legal expertise and impartiality that it deserves.

 

Environmental Justice 

No response

 

Criminal Justice

No response

 

Healthcare Equity

No response

 

Educational Inequities

No response

 

Voter Suppression

No response

 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

I am a African American woman, my direct team is made up of 3 white men, 2 white women, 1 black woman and 1 black man, and 1 Hispanic female. I am fortunate enough to have volunteers from every type of background who have dropped literature for me, financially supported me and attended rallies and events as my surrogate.

 

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities and promote racial justice?

As the first ever Black Women Judge in Kane County and the first ever countywide elected black woman it will be one of my goals to “reach back and pull up” as they say. I will actively participate in law school and professional forums to discuss racial equality and to help bring about interest for minority attorneys to work in Kane County.  In fact, it was one of my legal mentors, Judge Keith Brown that convinced me to move back to Kane County and work in the Public Defender’s Office here. I think that the pipeline from lawyer to the appointment or being elected to the bench needs to be more clear and equitable. All lawyers, especially minority lawyers who don’t have the relationships with the establishment Judges, should have an idea of what kinds of accomplishments, attributes and traits the Judiciary is looking for when appointing new Judges. It is past time to move away from the “who you know” process that we have today. But most importantly I will look at each and every individual that comes into my courtroom as just that. They will not be judged unfairly in any way based on their race, age, gender, economic status or sexuality. I will constantly be aware of my own biases (as we all have them) and check them as they need. I will continue to educate myself to be a better Judge and participate when I can in any actions and initiatives to fight to end racism, racial inequality and to promote racial justice. I want my own black children to grow up in a world where they are not judged or treated differently because of the color of their skin or their gender. This is the same society that my parents and ancestors wanted for me. This is one of my main motivations for running for this position and wanting to become a Judge in Kane County.

United States House of Representatives

Rick Laib - Candidate for US House of Representative District 11 - Republican

 

1. What is your experience in supporting anti-racism?

Advancing a Biblical worldview in our culture.

 

2. What racial inequities do you see in your district?

None that cannot be ultimately resolved by defense of religious liberty. 

 

3. What policies and actions will your office develop to address each of the following racial justice issues: 

 

Housing Inequalities

Advance and work for a free market and remove government involvement in the housing industry.

 

Environmental Justice 

Work to reduce taxes so that private organizations that have developed technologies that can best care for the planet, will be in an even better position to do so.

 

Criminal Justice

Work to defend religious liberty.

 

Healthcare Equity

Work to remove the government from the healthcare industry and let individuals work with health care providers and insurance companies directly to develop best health care options. 

 

Educational Inequities

Remove the government from the education business and encourage students to work with private lending organizations to secure their own loans.   

 

Voter Suppression

Remove federal involvement to elections and let the states administer their own elections as promised in the Constitution. 

4. What are the racial and gender demographics of your campaign team and/or your staff?

No response

  

5. As an elected official, what other specific actions will you take to reduce racial inequities

and promote racial justice?

No response

 

© 2020 We Can Lead Change Fox Valley

contact@wecanleadchange.org

  • YouTube
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter
  • Facebook App Icon